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All Posts Tagged: Sleep Apnea

The Dangerous Combination of Sleep Apnea and Hypertension

Snoring can affect just about anyone—even if you don’t realize you are doing it. While snoring occurs more frequently in men and those who are overweight, snoring tends to worsen with age. And, while occasional snoring is not very serious (and just a nuisance for your bed partner), it can be a risk for serious health problems, such as sleep apnea.  What is even worse, is the connection between sleep apnea and high blood pressure.

The Connection

Several studies have shown that sleep apnea and high blood pressure are quite the dangerous team—or should we say rivalries? When sleep apnea and high blood pressure are combined, it increases your risk for a stroke and heart attacks. Treatment of sleep apnea helps in lowering blood pressure. One treatment option might be an oral appliance, which helps to open the airway to encourage proper breathing at nighttime.

Lifestyle changes can also be beneficial for improving sleep apnea symptoms and diminishing hypertension. For example, losing weight if you are overweight, not drinking alcohol, and exercising regularly can all help in preventing the narrowing of your airway when you sleep.

Contact Dr. Bonnie Foster in Warrenton for sleep apnea treatment options in order to prevent hypertension and improve your health.

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Guard Your Heart and Treat Sleep Apnea

Snoring is an annoying act, especially for the person who listens to it every night—or maybe they’re lucky enough to fall asleep before you and don’t hear it. While snoring is annoying, if the snorer repeatedly stops breathing for brief moments throughout the night, it can lead to heart disease.

What is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea occurs when a person’s breathing pauses every five to 30 minutes per hor or more during sleep. When these episodes of pauses in breathing, the sleeper will wake up because they gasp for air. This prevents restful sleep and is commonly associated with high blood pressure, arrhythmia, stroke and heart failure.

Approximately one in five adults suffer from mild to moderate sleep apnea, with more men suffering from this condition than women. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in which weight on the upper chest and neck contributes to blocking the flow of air. OSA is associated with obesity, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

The Connection Between Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease

Sleep apnea can lead to heart attacks, which cause people to die in the middle of the night due to low oxygen or the stress of waking up frequently during sleep. As you might know, heart disease is the leading cause of death in America, while stroke takes fourth place for the cause of death and a leading cause of disability—high blood pressure is a major risk in both conditions.

The relationship between sleep apnea, hypertension and cardiovascular disease is very strong, which makes it vital that everyone understand this connection and seek treatment immediately.

Treatment for Sleep Apnea

To help minimize your chances of heart disease, it is important to receive proper treatment for your sleep apnea. While the most common treatment option is CPAP therapy, many people are non-compliant, meaning they can’t deal with the treatment or it is uncomfortable. An improved option for treatment from Dr. Foster is oral appliance therapy. Like a mouth guard in appearance, an oral appliance works to prevent your tongue from falling over your through during sleep. This helps to open the airway and keep you breathing throughout the night.

Contact Dr. Bonnie Foster in Warrenton, VA to learn more about the sleep apnea and heart disease connection. Seeking proper treatment can make all the difference you need to live a healthy life.

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Change Your Sleep Position

Have you ever thought about which sleep position is the best for your sleep? Understanding various sleep positions can help you better understand how to improve your sleep patterns. The sleep position you choose, directly affects your quality of sleep. Let’s take a look at the best and worst positions for sleeping.

The Worst Position

For one person, sleeping on the back might be the best, while another might be a side sleeper. To determine the best and worst position for you, simply sleep. Yes, that’s right—sleep. However, if you snore or suffer from sleep apnea, back sleeping is a big no-no. By sleeping on your back you may obstruct your airway, so try to sleep on your side to open your airway back up. An oral appliance will help with this as well.

The Best Position

If you suffer from sleep apnea, side sleeping may be the best choice because it helps keep your airways open. Research suggests that sleeping on your left side can relieve heartburn symptoms, while right side sleeping makes them worse. Remember to go with the flow and allow your body to fall into its intended position. And, yes, your mattress does matter—if it is worn and damaged, you could negatively impact your quality of sleep. No one stays in one position all night—doing so is bad for circulation—and it varies from person to person.

Contact our Warrenton, VA office to learn more about sleep positions and how sleep apnea might be affecting your rest.

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The Myths and Facts of Sleep Apnea

Are you tired during the day, but are getting the amount of rest you need? If so, you could be suffering from sleep apnea, which is a common disorder that causes frequent disruptions in your breathing, or shallow breaths while you sleep. These pauses can last from a few seconds to several minutes and can occur 30 times or more an hour. To help you better understand sleep apnea, lets take a look at some common myths and facts to help you decide if you or a loved one should see Dr. Bonnie Foster at our Warrenton office for further information.

Myth: People with sleep apnea know they have it because they’re jerked awake when their breathing stops.

Fact: Most people are unaware they have sleep apnea because they are sleeping when symptoms occur. Many people find out their breathing is affected by another who watches them or hears them while they sleep.

Myth: People with sleep apnea know they have it because they’re jerked awake when their breathing stops.

Fact: Most people are unaware they have sleep apnea because they are sleeping when symptoms occur. Many people find out their breathing is affected by another who watches them or hears them while they sleep. 

Myth: Sleep apnea is just an impressive word for snoring.

Fact: Snoring can be a sign of sleep apnea. But, it also might be an annoying sound that your bed partner makes throughout the night because the muscles in his or her throat relax too much.

Myth: Only people who are old or overweight get sleep apnea.

Fact: Sleep apnea can affect people of all ages and sizes. However, people who are overweight may be able to reduce symptoms by losing weight.

Myth: Alcohol is a good remedy.

Fact: Alcohol is not the solution. Instead, alcohol relaxes the muscles in the back of the throat, which blocks the airway—sleeping pills have the same effect.

Treatment of sleep apnea can include simple lifestyle changes or oral appliance therapy. An oral appliance is worn during sleep and gently pushes the lower jaw outward to create an unobstructed airway.

If you suffer from sleep apnea and are ready for a good nights sleep, contact Dr. Foster at our Warrenton office today!

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Improve Your Sleep and Quit Smoking

If you quit smoking it will significantly improve your overall health—especially your lungs. Did you also know that by quitting smoking you might also significantly improve your sleep?  You can! Let’s take a closer look at smoking and how it can negatively affect your sleep.

The Negative Effects of Smoking and Sleep

If you compare a smoker to a non-smoker, it has been shown that smokers are three times more likely to suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (Wow!). This is because smoking causes an increase of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway, which can further aggravate sleep apnea symptoms.

Both smoking and sleep apnea are deadly conditions that can severely shorten your life span when combined. For example, smoking and sleep apnea can both cause cardiovascular and respiratory health problems. This means treatment is vital to your health.

Seek Treatment and Quit Smoking

Smoking makes the swelling in your upper airway worse, which can further aggravate symptoms such as snoring and pauses in breathing (sleep apnea). In order to have successful treatment, you must quit smoking. By quitting your habit of smoking, you are significantly improving your treatment options and the results from treatment. While quitting smoking does not guarantee that your sleep apnea will disappear, it does ensure that treatment will be much more effective.

While it is up to you to quit smoking, we can successfully treat your sleep apnea with oral appliance therapy. Contact us today to learn more about your sleep apnea treatment options and tips for quitting your smoking habit.

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A Connection Between Sleep Apnea and Your Weight

Weight loss can significantly improve, and potentially eliminate, obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in obese people.  Researchers have found that people with severe obstructive sleep apnea who lost the recommended amount of weight, were three times more likely to experience remission of sleep apnea symptoms compared to those who did not lose any weight.

The Connection Between Sleep Apnea and Obesity

Not everyone with sleep apnea is overweight, but most patients are.  Losing weight gets rid of fat that blocks the windpipe. In doing so, it can not only fix your sleep trouble, but can also help with your cholesterol, knees, clothes and overall feeling of yourself.  Some people have found that moderate to severe sleep apnea can be completely corrected by losing excess weight.  And for others, even a small amount of weight loss can open up the throat and improve sleep apnea symptoms.

After weight loss, if you are still experiencing symptoms of sleep apnea, Dr. Bonnie Foster can work with you to create an appropriate treatment plan, including oral appliance therapy.  Schedule a consultation to determine the best treatment option for you. And remember, sleep apnea should never be ignored.

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February is American Heart Health Month

We commonly associate February with Valentine’s Day, but did you know it is American Heart Month, too? If you’re looking for the perfect Valentine’s Day gift, why not give the gift of heart health? This is a great time to commit to a healthy lifestyle by making small changes that can lead to a lifetime of heart health.

Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. And, while all Americans are at a risk of heart disease, African American men, especially those who live in the southeast region of the United States, are at the highest risk for heart disease. In addition, 40% of African Americans have high blood pressure, which is also a leading cause of heart disease and stroke.

For this reason, during American Heart Month, we want to encourage you to make a change in your health and start new, heart-healthy behaviors to improve your health, while reducing your risk of heart disease and stroke. Small changes can make all the difference in your health!

A Sleep Apnea Connection

Expanding on the topic of heart health, we also want to point out the connection between sleep apnea and heart disease. Due to low oxygen or the stress of waking up frequently during sleep, many people die in the middle of the night as a result of sleep apnea. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America, while stroke is the fourth leading cause of death, and is also a leading cause of disability with high blood pressure being a major risk in both conditions.

Sleep apnea, hypertension and heart disease continue to have a strong connection. Because of this, it is vital that everyone understand how these conditions are connected. Once you understand the importance of these strong connections, you can seek the proper treatment you need.

Make a Change

To not only improve your health, but your heart health, too, here are some helpful tips to follow during the month of February and beyond:

  • Schedule a visit with us to talk about the sleep apnea and heart disease connection.
  • Talk to your family doctor about your heart health.
  • Add exercise to your daily routine (even just 30 minutes a day helps).
  • Increase your healthy eating (at least 3 times a week helps).
  • Take steps to quit smoking.
  • Take medication as prescribed by your doctor.

Contact Dr. Bonnie Foster to learn more about how you can further protect your heart health by treating sleep apnea.

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A Link Between Sleep Apnea and Weight

We understand there are numerous influencers in the development of sleep apnea. While we might not understand each connection, one thing that is clear is that weight loss can significantly improve the symptoms of sleep apnea. Because obesity is a leading cause of sleep apnea, it is important to exercise and lose weight to protect your overall health.

Weight Loss and Improved Sleep Apnea

Weight loss can significantly improve, and potentially eliminate, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) symptoms in people that are obese. Researchers continue to study the area of sleep apnea, which is how we have learned that people with severe OSA who lost the recommended amount of weight were three times more likely to experience remission of sleep apnea symptoms compared to those who did not lose any weight.

Most patients with sleep apnea are overweight, but that doesn’t mean everyone is obese—only some. By losing weight, you can eliminate fat that blocks the windpipe, and it will not only fix your sleep complications, but can also help with:

  • Cholesterol
  • Knee pain
  • Fit of your clothes
  • Overall feeling of yourself

It has even been found that moderate to severe sleep apnea can be completely corrected by losing excess weight. And, for others, even a small amount of weight loss can open up the throat and improve sleep apnea symptoms.

Sleep Apnea Treatment

If you have lost weight, but are still experiencing symptoms of sleep apnea, it is important to seek further care. While the weight loss might not have eliminated all of your symptoms, it still helped. Contact Dr. Bonnie Foster at Craniofacial Pain & Dental Sleep Center of Virginia to learn more about why your sleep apnea symptoms might still be present, and what treatment options are available. Through oral appliance therapy, you may finally find relief from your symptoms.

When was the last time you slept through the night, waking up feeling refreshed? Remember, sleep apnea should never be ignored. Dr. Foster at Craniofacial Pain & Dental Sleep Center of Virginia can help provide relief from sleep apnea in Warrenton for many patients.

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A Sleep Apnea History Lesson

I love history—don’t you? While we can read books upon books on the history of the world, government, music, art, and so many other topics, what about the history of sleep apnea? We know the basis of sleep apnea, but let’s take a look at the history and how it became to be an issue we watch out for at Warrenton Dental Care.

Beginnings of Sleep Apnea

Since the ancient times, sleep apnea has been observed. Even if a treatment or cause was not clear, it was still known what sleep apnea was. In the late 19th century, the term “Pickwickian Syndrome” was created to describe symptoms of sleep apnea. Research, though, focused on the patients’ obesity rather than the disordered breathing they were experiencing during sleep.

In 1965, the first polysomnograph recorded apneas during sleep, which were the frequent occurrences of stoppage in breathing throughout the night. Further research continued to show that obesity was not essential for sleep apnea, as there were many other comorbidities associated with this condition.

Continued Sleep Apnea Research

As sleep apnea continued, William Dement established the first sleep clinic at Stanford University in California in 1970. Two years later, Christian Guilleminault joined the clinic and concentrated on respiratory disorders during sleep. The research on sleep apnea continues to grow each year with more interest than ever before.

Between 1975 and 1980, there were 319 articles on sleep apnea in medical literature alone. This increase in awareness continues to help pave the way for advanced treatment options to successfully help you get a better night’s sleep. With history of sleep apnea continuing to expand to this day, dentists continue to provide advanced treatment options as an alternative to CPAP therapy.

To learn more about sleep apnea and how our dentist in Warrenton can help you find relief, visit Warrenton Dental Center. As a team, we are available to educate our patients in Warrenton, VA on sleep apnea and the available treatment options. Let us help you get a better night’s sleep.

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Lifestyle Changes Can Help Relieve Sleep Apnea Symptoms

Sleep apnea treatments are key to getting a better night’s sleep. However, there are some lifestyle changes you can make, too, that will significantly improve your symptoms. Through lifestyle changes, you can improve your sleep while eliminating sleep apnea symptoms. You can enjoy an improvement for your health and sleep. Continue reading to learn more about lifestyle changes you should make.

Quit Smoking

Yes, we all know that smoking is harmful to your health, but what about your sleep? Smoking has a significant negative impact on your overall health and sleep apnea. So toss that cigarette out and quit smoking today! If you quit smoking, you will notice the differences in not only your overall health, but sleep apnea symptoms as well. While quitting might be difficult, the end result is well worth the initial struggle. Protect your health and improve your sleep by quitting that bad habit today!

Exercise to Lose Weight

One of the leading causes of sleep apnea is obesity, which means one major change in your life should be exercise and weight loss. If you are overweight, your airway can become blocked. By losing weight you can improve your sleep and eliminate your symptoms, while also improving your overall heath. Remember to get regular exercise, even if that means only 30 minutes a day—every bit helps. By adding a little bit of exercise in your life, you can improve your health while getting a better night’s sleep.

Stop Drinking Alcohol

A glass of wine or beer after a long day might be enjoyable, but excessive drinking can be detrimental to your health and sleep. Minimize your alcohol intake or stop completely to further improve your health and sleep. It’s a compromise you will need to make to feel better.

To learn more about sleep apnea in Warrenton and lifestyle changes to make, contact Dr. Bonnie Foster. By properly treating sleep apnea, and making lifestyle changes, you can improve your overall health while getting a better night’s sleep. What are you waiting for?

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